Closing gaps in teacher quality depends on fixing the root causes

A report claiming gaps in access to high-quality teachers is due to a labor shortage misses the point, a review shows. Instead, the root causes of the gaps must be addressed, like rigorous but alternative pathways to teaching and incentives for attracting and keeping educators in hard-to-staff schools.

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Report shows when tenure ends, teachers leave

A new analysis suggests that tenure reform in Louisiana increased the overall exit rate for teachers, especially those with the most experience. Schools with lower standardized test scores had higher rates of teacher exits, meaning that these schools were disproportionately impacted.

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Survey: Number of future teachers reaches all-time low

In a 2016 national survey of college freshmen, the number of students who say they will major in education has reached its lowest point in 45 years. Just 4.2 percent intend to major in education—a typical first step to becoming a teacher—compared to 11 percent in 2000; 10 percent in 1990; and 11 percent in 1971, according to data gathered by the UCLA’s Cooperative Institutional Research Program. Take those numbers and add them to the poor rates of teacher retention in many public schools, and it equals a serious problem for students who all deserve a “caring, qualified and committed educator,” said National Education Association President Lily Eskelsen García.

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